FOOTBALL Franklin

SpaceRaider

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Jul 22, 2001
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God's Country
virtue signaling piece of sh**


 

blueraiderJT

Hall of Famer
Oct 15, 2006
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HELL YES! CRAZY IS GONE! Now, we know why Asher left and why Ali is returning. Now we need the O line idiots outta there and then we might do something. Franklin really reached his peak from 07-13. People can bring up Cal but they did some shady stuff to get talent in there and he had a good OL coach too.

That letter just really shows that he's been burnt out for a long time and should have left after 17. Brent was the reason we did well in 18. He ran that offense as much or if not more that TF did. Hell, Brent ran many of the practices that year. and had a fresh understanding of Franklin's concepts. TF was more or less on autopilot with Brent. In 19 and 20, it was all TF and his playcalling and game adjustment was terrible.

If we can't get a new HC, we might as well get new coaches on O and hopefully on the line. I would love for West and others to "retire" too.
 
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May 9, 2012
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I wonder who he is singling out as supposed to be caring about the players but putting them down on a daily basis and saying they are not worthy? Somebody should probably look into that. Might be a reason for the lack of wins.
 
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MT Glenn

True Blue
Sep 19, 2005
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I wonder who he is singling out as supposed to be caring about the players but putting them down on a daily basis and saying they are not worthy? Somebody should probably look into that. Might be a reason for the lack of wins.
I just assumed he was pointing the finger at me, since not being happy with a 3-6 season is obviously a lack of caring.
 
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AustinLewis

Hall of Famer
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Sep 16, 2006
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I wonder who he is singling out as supposed to be caring about the players but putting them down on a daily basis and saying they are not worthy? Somebody should probably look into that. Might be a reason for the lack of wins.
Probably the fans. Who have ripped MT FB for underperforming the last two years
 

FranklinRaider315

All American
Jun 24, 2009
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Franklin, TN
I have a hard time sympathizing with a career long, self promoting, offensive football coach who’s only claim to fame as a player is being the ‘76 leading rusher for Murray St with 280 yards in one losing season. And, that he played with Frank Beamer. His grandiose declaration about the game is insulting to me and anyone else who actually played the game in high school, college or the NFL. As a self-described “destroyer”, he personally benefited for years from all the rules changed to “protect” his defenseless wide receivers and QB’s.

Anyone who straps on a helmet understands and accepts the game for what it is. A contact sport.

Maybe Stock, West and Mallory will each have a similar “twilight of their career” epiphany and also move on. We can only hope for the sake of the Blue Raider Football Program.
 
May 9, 2012
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Seems like a better send off for the author of the most prolific offense in blue raider history. Seems to be a very toxic environment. Stock sure has left a legacy...
 

SpaceRaider

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Jul 22, 2001
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God's Country
His Facebook post is a doozy. Looks like one of those late-night posts. Especially the last P.S. comment.
Something is definitely not right over at Murphy Center.
Well, no doubt but I suspect a lot is wrong with Tony Franklin, what bunch of self-serving bilge.

A self-righteous statement about continuing a war on college football while all the time hawking his Tony Franklin System at discount prices.

F... Tony Franklin
 

Sommy

True Blue
Aug 2, 2001
673
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His Facebook post is a doozy. Looks like one of those late-night posts. Especially the last P.S. comment.
Something is definitely not right over at Murphy Center.
can someone cut and paste his FB post here?

we all agree change was needed so this is a positive for the program. New ideas. TF was living off some fame he made like 15-20 years ago and he never progressed. Same offenses and talent evaluation that has continued to decline. Do we think he ran off Asher or was Asher tired of the overall program?

new OC is yet another selling point to a transfer portal QB that wants to start day 1 .
 
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MT Glenn

True Blue
Sep 19, 2005
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can someone cut and paste his FB post here?

we all agree change was needed so this is a positive for the program. New ideas. TF was living off some fame he made like 15-20 years ago and he never progressed. Same offenses and talent evaluation that has continued to decline. Do we think he ran off Asher or was Asher tired of the overall program?

new OC is yet another selling point to a transfer portal QB that wants to start day 1 .
Thank You Football
Final Respects
It started in the backyard…just me, my dad, and my brother, and an oblong pigskin. We played simple games of pitch and catch before escalating into full scale tackle football on the gravel playgrounds at East Side Elementary School. I don’t remember ever loving this game. I do remember loving my team-mates in the 12 years I played organized football and loving and respecting the young boys and men I would coach for 40 seasons.
Football is not a contact sport. It’s a violent game. If played the way it must be played to maximize success, you must mentally and physically condition a group of young boys, or men, to have little to no regards for their health, or the health of their opponents. You must swarm to the football and destroy everything on your pathway to reach it.
Over the years I have been both the destroyer and the “destroyee” as a player and as a coach. I’ve witnessed and partaken in the splattering of brain cells and the breaking of bones. And on November 21, 2020 at the ripe young age of 63, I ended this violent experiment in an unexpected final game of the 2020 season at Troy University. It is time to discover what I want to do when I grow up.
I’m not a “big-name” coach, though I’ve had my share of recognizable successes. I’ve been labeled an innovative offensive guru, as well as an epic failure. I’ve won championships and I’ve gone 1-11. I’ve been paid more money than anyone should be paid for coaching a game that some men would do for free. Most of my peers in my profession would recognize my name well enough to have a strong opinion as to whether I was worthy of accolades, hatred, or indifference.
From 1981-1982 and from 1993-1995 I coached high school and middle school football with men who would form my football soul as a coach. Billy Mitchell was the football savant, Bill Taylor was the charismatic tough and loving guy, and Steve Aull was the quarterback guru with an entrepreneurial background. Joe and David Morris were the sons of a legend who would embrace me and make me part of a family I hadn’t earned the right to be associated with. And Paul Leahy would publicly and privately praise me to the point where I thought maybe I belonged in the discussions of being referred to as a “good coach”. These men made me fall in love with coaching because of a camaraderie and brotherhood that was rare. They spoiled me. We coached, drank, gambled, and worked as brothers who loved each other enough to always tell the truth. I’d discover over the next 39 years how unusual this camaraderie was. I never found it in college football or in any other phase of life outside of my relationships with my brother and two close coaching comrades and former team-mates, Bruce Raley and David Barnes.
·
I have an all-time favorite player. I’ll call him “Johnny Cobra”, a sixteen-year-old whom I coached from one of my early jobs as a 20 something year old who thought he knew a lot more than he did. “Johnny Cobra” wasn’t a good player. He didn’t run fast or hit hard or throw a ball particularly well. He was just “Johnny Cobra”, a guy who needed the game and needed to be on the team, more than the team needed him. A teenager who longed to belong to something bigger than himself. A loner whom football would make feel as if he were no longer alone.
“Johnny Cobra” gave me more than football would ever give me. He gave me a sense of purpose and the ability to see and to realize that the game of football was a conduit to share differences in life and to make one have a sense of belonging whenever the world didn’t make sense. A football team provides an environment where most misfits in society could be accepted and “Johnny Cobra” was certainly a misfit.
Over my forty years in coaching I haven’t always said or done the right things. At times I’ve allowed to much ego and false pride to serve as a pathway for poor decisions that have no doubt hurt some of the young men I’ve coached. Early in my career as a 26-year-old head coach I made a decision that would hurt a young man’s self-respect and make him feel less accepted by his peers, which in turn angered his parents and made them feel as if they should attack me. They did and they were right. Thirty-seven years later I made a journey to apologize. I was forgiven.
I also am keenly aware that I’ve made a positive difference and that I’ve radically changed the life perspective of many of my former players. I’m without doubt that hundreds of young men have a better life because of the relationship we shared. And I’m also keenly aware that others will go to their graves with the firm belief I wronged them in some way and didn’t treat them fairly. Both groups would believe their truths to be somewhat right.
The football life I’ve lived has been one of a peasant, as well a prince. I made $250 my first coaching gig and I’ve made over $3 million total the last eight seasons. I’ll profess the years where I made less than $10,000 as a high school coach were much harder work than the luxury life of being a college coach. Listening to college coaches who are making six and seven figure incomes bitch about how difficult their life is makes me excited to move back into the world of realistic and appreciative workers.
But I regress.
This is a love letter. A letter of resignation to a way of life, a way of comfort and ease. I’m so fortunate and blessed to have been able to capitalize on this sport. Thousands of high school and middle school and youth league coaches are better than me, more talented, and more successful. But I was one of the lucky ones who took advantage of a small window of opportunity and made a good career and income out of coaching a game.
So, I say thank you to all the young boys who are now men and the young men who are now older men. Thank you for making my life memorable and easier than I deserved. Every pay raise, every new house, every college education of my children, every article of praise, and every personal and professional accolade came because of you.
I’ve already revealed my all-time favorite player and now I’ll share my most beloved team. It’s not the 1993 or 1995 state championship squads of Mayfield High. Neither is it the 2012 Louisiana Tech team that averaged 52 points per game and broke national records. It’s not the 1997 University of Kentucky squad that beat Alabama in overtime and had thousands of fans storm the field and tear down the goalpost. Nor is it the bowl and championship winning teams of Troy, MTSU, or Louisiana Tech. It isn’t the record-breaking bowl winning team at Cal in 2015 with the #1 NFL draft pick, quarterback Jared Goff.
No. The all-time favorite team is a tie. It’s the 2019 and 2020 MTSU Blue Raiders. Never have I had a group of young men so disparaged by people who supposedly care about them. Never have I had a team compete as hard, or practice any better, or lead by example than these last two seasons. The toughness and courage to compete while being disparaged and told day after day that you’re not good enough, combined with the tenacity and love for each other to continue in the face of a worldwide deadly pandemic makes these guys easily my favorite group to have had the honor to coach.
I’ve listened to leaders and critics accuse them of being “entitled” and “not working hard enough” or “not being tough enough” to score more points than their opponents. In the meantime, some of these young men pulled late night shifts at Wal Mart, Amazon, Uber Eats, Door Dash, and other workplaces to pay their bills, pay for parts or all of their education, pay for their food, while simultaneously helping their families by sending money back home. And they did this while competing and training at the highest level of college football, which is a full-time job by itself. Some of these critics meanwhile raised their children in a life of comfort and historic privilege.
Winning games has never been the final measure, or even the most important measure, of my success as a coach or a man. As I listened to different coaches’ whine that “nothing is worse than losing” Kentucky offensive line coach John Schlarman, while fighting for his life, would send me a message after every game. He was the source of motivation and love…a message of inspiration, encouragement, win or lose, reminding me how lucky I am to have this life, this one more breath of oxygen. His voice reminded me over the last couple of years that there are so many things more important than whether we scored enough points or not.
 

MT Glenn

True Blue
Sep 19, 2005
608
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The rest of it:

I reflect upon this toughest human I ever had the honor to spend time with, both as a player I would coach and as a man I would later give his first college coaching job to. He fought his painful, heart wrenching, two-year battle with the deadly cancer cholangiocarcinoma (the same disease that killed my wife’s sister), while continuing to coach, just to have one more day with his wife and four children, one more breath of oxygen, so that he could share his philosophies of love, compassion, hard work, brotherhood, and teamwork with his players, his friends, and the fraternity of coaches lucky enough to have shared time with him.
So in making this final decision of how to end this 40 year adventure in coaching, if I had to choose and could pick any group of men and be guaranteed to win a championship and score 50 points a game and be recognized and lauded…I’d have to say thanks, but no thanks. I’ll take the 2019 and 2020 Blue Raiders and be grateful that my final coaching experience was with young courageous talented men who just so happened to not score enough points to win as many games as some thought necessary to earn their conditional respect.
But oh my God, they are winners. And man, oh man, will they make this world better than my generation left it.
Thank you, football, but most of all thank you to the young men who gave me a 40-year football life full of competition, love, respect, friendships, and satisfaction. I can never repay you for this amazing journey you allowed me to live with you. I never loved this game, but I loved, respected, and cherished the young men courageous, talented, and empathetic enough to play it.
Coach Tony Franklin
PS- To those who wonder if I will continue my war on the cowards of the college football world who have shown horrendous leadership in our greatest time of need, you need not wonder. That fight has just begun. Stay tuned.
 

Sommy

True Blue
Aug 2, 2001
673
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”horrendous leadership in our greatest time of need”

What does that mean? Massaro or Stockstill? Or both ?
 
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Tyler Pellom

Blue Raider Fan
Staff
Apr 3, 2020
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”horrendous leadership in our greatest time of need”

What does that mean? Massaro or Stockstill? Or both ?
I think he’s talking about the NCAA.

He’s going to come out hard for player safety and player compensation.
 

mtfblue

All Conference
Jul 26, 2005
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there are issue's in the MC and issue's that he has none about. He may do the same thing the OC shoop has done advocate for player safety and compensation
 
Oct 24, 2019
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As a UC Berkeley grad, I've followed Franklin from his time in Berkeley when I lived there as a post-grad, to the present here in Murfreesboro where I live now.

Save for the 2015 Cal season, I have never been too impressed with Franklin and his system.

While not entirely impressed with his system, I have, for whatever reason, respected him as a coach and as a man. I had no reason not to.

However, that all has changed. I have never seen such a hypocritical, pompous, sanctimonious person. Glad he's gone.
 

FranklinRaider315

All American
Jun 24, 2009
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Franklin, TN
I’ve been both directly and indirectly involved with college football for over 40 years of my life as a player, grad assistant, freshman coach or booster and I’ve never seen a coach go off in a public Jerry Maguire rant like Franklin’s. I thought the Tommy West post firing rant at Memphis was pretty bizarre and wrote it off as hurt feelings and anger.

But this masterpiece written and posted by Tony Franklin on Facebook is outright over the top. I sincerely hope he seeks counseling.
 
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blueraiderJT

Hall of Famer
Oct 15, 2006
5,466
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"I'm tired of this violent game and what it does to young men. Hey, if you buy my system before midnight, you can save 150.00" Magical success. LOL. We sure as hell haven't had magical success. LOL. That dude is a multi-millionaire and every cent came from "violence". I bet he's not giving all his money back. So glad to have that crazy POS out of here.
 

dukewayne

All American
Jul 11, 2008
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Seems pretty clear that he takes somes swipes at the MT fans for supposedly attacking the players for losing games. Around here on this board, players are rarely if ever attacked. If they are, usually others on here challenge those comments.

Now it is admittedly different with the coaches. They have and continue to be blamed for the lack of success. Commenting on the the coaches is quite different than going after the players. Maybe he is talking about Twitter or something where nothing from that cesspool would surprise me. An indictment more of the culture on Twitter rather than MT fans.

I'm curious just when was it that TF arrived at football being this awful violent and terrible sport. Seems convenient if he is just arriving at that right at the end of his decades long career.
 

blueraiderJT

Hall of Famer
Oct 15, 2006
5,466
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Franklin returning to MT

dug back in the history of the board to find this thread. Interesting to look back
We were excited to have TF here when he came back. Sure we were. He just had the no.1 draft pick as a QB and when he was here in 2009, he helped us get our best record as a D1/FBS school. We had reason to be excited. Then, we just stagnated and went backwards. His offense just became the same old thing. After 5 seasons of this crap, I think we are all ready to see him gone. Now, with this peek into his weird crazy brain, we know we are ready to move on.
 

AustinLewis

Hall of Famer
Staff
Sep 16, 2006
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We were excited to have TF here when he came back. Sure we were. He just had the no.1 draft pick as a QB and when he was here in 2009, he helped us get our best record as a D1/FBS school. We had reason to be excited. Then, we just stagnated and went backwards. His offense just became the same old thing. After 5 seasons of this crap, I think we are all ready to see him gone. Now, with this peek into his weird crazy brain, we know we are ready to move on.
I was excited to have TF back. And he did good work while he was here the second time. Ultimately, however, the offense struggled the last 2-3 years. Why?

IMO, the OL. I'm not sure why Stock has kept Mallory (OL) and West (DL) around. Both units have struggled for several years and need fresh blood up top.

TF's version of the spread influenced all levels of football. The innovation of TF - along with Mumme and Leach - changed football. And the game is better for their work.
 

MT01

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Aug 1, 2005
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Everyone was excited to get TF back. We had one of our best years with him calling the plays. He did amazing things at a place in Cal that doesn't traditionally have a good program.

There was no reason not to expect big things from his return. But there was one problem. You have to have players even in the TF system. And what has been deteriorating for years is our recruiting. Even with Brent, when he looked around the field - at this roster - there wasn't much to work with. Since the day TF came back, we've never had an OL that could even protect the head coach's own son much less was capable of dictating a game. The union of TF and Brent Stockstill should have been a marriage made in heaven yet eight wins was the ceiling because there wasn't much of a defense nor an OL, nor a viable receiving corp, or much of anything else for that matter.

So, yeah we were all excited about this potential but when half of your roster are players that you beat out Division II and I-AA schools for the end result becomes rather predictable.